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Alexander (Sasha) Kitaysky

Research Interests: 

The main focus of my current research program is on the fundamental question: 
Can we predict population responses (range shift, adaptation or extinction) to an environmental change based on current phenotypic and biological age structures of natural populations of marine top-predators?

Specifically, I am interested in (A) how climate- and human induced environmental changes affect physiology, reproduction and survival of different phenotypes in wild seabird populations; and (B) the consequences of such differential selection pressure on individuals for the spatial and temporal dynamics of their populations.

Sasha Kitaysky
Professor of Integrative Physiology
Office: 
413 Irving 1
907-474-5179
Lab: 
110 Irving 1
907-474-5753
Postal Address: 
Institute of Arctic Biology
PO Box 757000
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Fairbanks, AK 99775-7000
  • 1992-1996 Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, USA
  • 1986 MS, Irkutsk State University, Russia
  • 2013-current Professor of Integrative Physiology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, IAB, UAF
  • 2007-2013 Associate Professor of Integrative Physiology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, IAB, UAF
  • 2003-2007 Assistant Professor of Integrative Physiology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, IAB, UAF
  • 2000-2003 Research Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, UW
  • 1997-2000 Research Associate, Department of Zoology, UW, Seattle

2006

Kitaysky, A.S. et al., 2006. A mechanistic link between chick diet and decline in seabirds?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 273, pp.445–450.
Pravosudov, V.V., Kitaysky, A.S. & Omanska, A., 2006. The relationship between migratory behaviour memory and the hippocampus: an intraspecific comparison. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 273, pp.2641–2649.
Pravosudov, V.V. & Kitaysky, A.S., 2006. Effects of nutritional restrictions during post-hatching development on adrenocortical function in western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica). General and Comparative Endocrinology, 145, pp.25–31.

2005

Benoqitz-Fredericks, Z.M. & Kitaysky, A.S., 2005. Benefits and costs of rapid growth in common murre (Uria aalge) chicks. Journal of Avian Biology, 36, pp.287–294.
Benowitz-Fredericks, Z.M., Kitaysky, A.S. & Wingfield, J.C., 2005. Steroids in allantoic waste: An integrated measure of steroids in ovo. Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 1046, pp.204–213.
Kitaysky, A.S. et al., 2005. The adrenocortical response of tufted puffin chicks to nutritional deficits. Hormones and Behavior, 47, pp.606–619.

2004

Thompson, C.W. & Kitaysky, A.S., 2004. Polumorphic flight-feather molt sequence in tufted puffins-a rare phenomenon in birds. The Auk, 121, pp.35–45.

2003

Kitaysky, A.S., Springer, A.M. & Wingfield, J.C., 2003. When, where and why Steller Sea lions experience physiological stress-evidence from stress hormones and diet quality. Final Report to the Marine Mammal Research Consortium.
Kitaysky, A.S. et al., 2003. Benefits and costs of increased corticosterone secretion in seabird chicks. Hormones and Behavior, 43, pp.140–149.

Pages

  • The Bering Sea’s Regime Shifts: Using a century of data to examine dynamics of nutritional stress and trophic linkages in fish-eating seabirds. - NPRB 1410
  • Early breeding season responses of red-legged kittiwakes to changes of prey availability and linkages to the non-breeding stage - NPRB 1409
  • Forage Patch Dynamics I - NPRB, NSF
  • Forage Patch Dynamics II - NPRB, NSF
  • Effects of Physical Forcing in the Bering Sea Ecosystem - NPRB
  • BIOL 441 Animal Behavior
Current Graduate Students (More info)
  • Alexis Will
Past Graduate Students

Advised

  • Rebecca Young (Ph.D.)
  • Chris Barger (M.S.)
  • Ine Dorresteijn (M.S.)
  • T. Morgan (M.S.)
  • J. Sears (M.S.)
  • Michael Shultz (M.S.)
  • Tom Dempsey (M.S.)

Co-Advised

  • Jannik Schultner (Ph.D.)
  • Morgan Benowitz-Fredericks (Ph.D.)

 

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